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Ishpeming : In The News

198 Ishpeming Articles | Page: | Show All

Five reasons why folks should visit the U.P.

As if anyone needs a reason to visit the Upper Peninsula (hey, we have year-round activities and fun!), a recent press release by the Duluth Trading Company and Pure Michigan gives folks some food for thought when considering a trip up north.
 
Excerpt: Grab your flannel and pack your bag, one of America’s hidden travel gems awaits you. Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was just named the Most Flannel City in America by Duluth Trading Company. To earn this distinction, "Yoopers" (those living in the Upper Peninsula, or" U.P.") secured more than 40 percent of all bracket votes in Duluth Trading Co.’s Flannel City Face-Off competition, defeating 15 of the toughest cities in the nation.
 
For the rest of the press release, visit this link.
 
Source: Business Wire
 

Local NWS staffer gets statewide award

A local National Weather Service employee has been going above and beyond her job title to educate Great Lakes residents about weather and currents that can pose a danger.

Excerpt: Megan Dodson of the National Weather Service was recently recognized for her exemplary partnership with Michigan Sea Grant and thus was awarded their Van Snider Partnership Award for 2014. The Michigan Sea Grant team has come to rely on Megan’s expertise and appreciate her enthusiasm for her work.

For more on her work, go here.

Source: Michigan State University Extension

Keep up to date on the snow here

Local weather stations and news sites are tracking the snowstorm this week closely, so if you need to know what's coming next, here's some real-time resources to check from Mlive.

Excerpt: Most of the western half of the Upper Peninsula has at least nine inches of snow on the ground from snowfall yesterday through last night. Marquette is now reporting 14.5" of snow since yesterday. Ishpeming, MI has 14.2" and Ontonagon, MI has 8.7".

The latest on the snowfall can be found here.

Source: Mlive.com

Ghost towns of the U.P. explored

There are many "lost" and abandoned towns in Michigan, remnants of better economic times. This look at some of those ghost towns shows a picture of the state's history.
 
Excerpt: Some of the abandoned towns that dot Michigan's landscape from the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula to the Ohio and Indiana state lines are no more than outlines of foundations or a few weathered cemetery headstones. A few, like Fayette, are preserved as historical sites. Others still have a handful of homes.
 
All speak to boom-and-bust cycles in Michigan's history.
 
For the whole story, go here.
 
Source: Detroit Free Press

Deer Lake taken off EPA hotspot list

Deer Lake near Ishpeming has been on the EPA's cleanup list for decades, and now finally has reached its environmental goals to be taken off.

Excerpt: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced that two U.S. Areas of Concern, Deer Lake in the Lake Superior basin and White Lake in the Lake Michigan basin, have been removed from the binational list of toxic hotspots that were targeted for cleanup in the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

For the rest of the article, click here.

Source: ABC 10

U.P. wins Flannel City Face-Off

While the Upper Peninsula isn't a city, it did manage to win the title of "Flannel City" in a recent contest.

Excerpt: With almost 27,000 total votes the U.P. is now the flannel capital of America.

The U.P. faced off against Duluth, Minnesota in the Duluth Trading Company's "Flannel City Face-Off."

For the whole story, click here.

Source: UpperMichigansSource.com

Old mine shafts suggested as energy option

Alternative methods of energy are more crucial than ever, and one geothermal answer might be in good supply here in the Upper Peninsula.

Excerpt: "Mineshaft geothermal" is gaining attention here as researchers investigate the energy potential stored hundreds of feet below the ground. The water in these abandoned and flooded mines, which expand throughout the U.P., is just now starting to be used to heat and cool buildings.

More on the story is online here.

Source: Midwest Energy News

App might make winter driving easier

The U.P. has a history of innovation when it comes to snow, and the latest on that front is an idea for a new mobile app from a recent coding event held in Marquette.

Excerpt: Commuting to work during a Michigan winter could be a little easier and safer with the SnowFi app.

Using real-time data from the Michigan Department of Transportation, the app would let users know when roads have been plowed.

For more on the idea, go here.

Source: Mlive.com

State taking suggestions on name for trail from Detroit to the U.P.

The new statewide trail that will straddle all of Michigan is in need of a name, so the state DNR is asking for help.

Excerpt: Want to help name a potentially historic feature of Michigan?

The state’s Department of Natural Resources is asking Michiganders for suggestions on what to name a trail that runs from Belle Isle Park in Detroit to Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula. The trail will connect existing trail paths across Michigan.

The rest of the story is online here.

Source: Mlive.com

Michigan's U.P. goes head-to-head with its energy future

A major problem facing utilities and governments in the U.P. right now is how energy will be provided in the near future, once the region's main power plant closes. This extensive look at some suggested solutions is worth a read.

Excerpt: Across the country, utilities, regulators and government officials are grappling with the complex question of how to replace the energy from retiring power plants.

On Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, that transition is playing out on a much more urgent timescale.

For more on the story, go here.

Source: Midwest Energy News

Plaidurday in the U.P. is this week

Plaid is like the unofficial color of the U.P., although you could make a strong argument for green and gold, or hunter orange. But plaid has its own celebration, coming up this week.

Excerpt: If you’ve been a fan or customer of Yooper Steez for a year or longer, you’ll know that we love to celebrate Plaidurday. As Yoopers, we are fortunate to be immersed in a culture plentiful with plaid. However, there are many places without this same fortune. And that’s the goal, to share this the joy with everyone, because in the end we’re all connected by a common thread.

More on the event is online here.

Source: YooperSteez.com

Photographing the Upper Peninsula

A trip to the U.P. should never come without a camera of some type, if only to remember your adventures by. For some, it can serve as a reason in itself to visit.
 
Excerpt: A world away from the concrete mountains and steel-lined Chicago River is a rolling land filled with trees, rivers and streams, deer, badger, wolverines, moose, wolf and both black and brown bear. Roughly a 6-8 hour drive north of Chicago is the upper peninsula of Michigan, the UP as many call it.
 
For the whole blog post, go here.
 
Source: Out of Chicago

A less snowy winter? Very possible.

After last year's winter, it seems like a foregone conclusion that this winter must be bringing less snow than it did last time. Forecasters are saying that might be true.

Excerpt: The Climate Prediction Center issues forecasts for the winter. Right now they are making a clear cut forecast that Michigan will have below normal precipitation this winter.

Yes that means Michigan would have much lower snow amounts than last year, when a few cities had record snowfall.

For the rest of the story, click here.

Source: Mlive.com

Best spots to see fall colors include the U.P.

The Detroit Free Press has a list of recommendations for best places in Michigan to see the fall colors change, including some in the Upper Peninsula.

Excerpt: When it comes to fall color, Michigan has an embarrassment of riches.

Rolling farmland, hilly woodlands and beach and dune views make Michigan one of the best places in the country for fall color viewing.

Check out the whole list here.

Source: Detroit Free Press

StoryCorps records stories of life in the U.P.

A recording program that collects oral histories across the U.S. visited Marquette this summer; this article explores a few of those stories.

Excerpt: StoryCorps came to Marquette this summer to collect stories about everyday life in the Upper Peninsula, as they've done in hundreds of cities across the country. They listened to miners and immigrants, heard about skiing and snowshoeing, learned about life in this rugged, isolated place.

But in essence the stories people told sounded awfully familiar to the staff in the recording booth. They weren't much different than what they hear in the South, or out West, or in the Great Plains.

For the whole article, go here.

Source: Lansing State Journal
198 Ishpeming Articles | Page: | Show All
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